Graduate Students in Musicology at Eastman

 

Student News & Updates

Stephen Armstrong completed his master’s degrees in musicology and piano performance at Michigan State University, where he submitted a thesis on the historiography of Franz Liszt’s piano music. A chapter of his thesis is forthcoming (2015) in the Journal of the American Liszt Society. He has presented papers at AMS chapter meetings, the North American Conference on Nineteenth-Century Music, the North American Conference on Video Game Music, and at the “Music, Narrative, and the Moving Image” conference held by the International Association for Word and Music Studies. An avid pianist and rock keyboardist, he has performed throughout his native Michigan and in Italy. His research interests include virtuosity, mysticism, and music and literature studies. He holds a Sproull Fellowship.

Jacek Blaszkiewicz’s review of a new critical edition of Edouard Lalo’s Fiesque is forthcoming in the March issue of MLA Notes.

Rachel Brashier was awarded the T. Temple Tuttle Prize from the Niagara Chapter of the Society for Ethnomusicology for her Paper entitled “In Gamelan You Have to Become One ‘Feeling’: Sensory Embodiment and Transfer of Musical Knowledge.”

Regina Compton enters with a B.M. in Clarinet Performance from Southern Methodist University and an M.M. in Music History from the University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music. Regina is the recipient of the Eastman GTA Prize for Excellence in Teaching (2011), the Jerald C. Graue Fellowship (2011), and the American Handel Society’s J. Merrill Knapp Research Fellowship (2013), which supported study in London at the British Library. Regina has presented at national and international conferences, most recently, the 2013 annual meeting of the American Musicological Society. Regina also serves as the general director of Chamber Music Campania (www.chambermusiccampania.org) a cross-disciplinary summer festival in southern Italy. Her dissertation examines the communicative potential of Handel’s recitativo semplice in his operas for the First Royal Academy of Music (1720-1728).

Gabrielle Cornish completed a B.A. with majors in Music and Russian Studies at the University of Rochester. Following her undergraduate degree, she spent a year living in Russia as a Fulbright Scholar. Her research interests include music and politics in the Soviet Union, Russian cinema and sound, and protest music in post-Soviet society.

John Green is the 2016-17 Raymond Ball Fellow supporting his dissertation about John Cage on film and television.  In addition to researching modern American music, Green also performs traditional Zimbabwean music.

Thom Jencks has completed a BA in Philosophy and Music from Augustana College, as well as an MMus at Royal Holloway University of London where he submitted with distinction a thesis with J. P. E. Harper-Scott titled “Where Are We?” examining topics of environment and identity in Charles Ives’s Piano Trio. He has also presented on topics such as musical modernism and John Luther Adams at conferences in Nottingham and Vancouver. His research interests centre around the topics of aesthetics and ecologies of post-war music.

Lauron Kehrer earned her MA in Ethnomusicology at Eastman, as well as a Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies from the Susan B. Anthony Institute for Women and Gender Studies (University of Rochester). Before moving to Rochester she completed her BM in Flute Performance at Michigan State University, with an undergraduate specialization in Women, Gender, and Social Justice. Her doctoral studies are supported by a Sproull Fellowship and she is a past recipient of the Ann Clark Fehn award. Lauron has presented papers at national conferences including AMS, SAM, SEM, and Feminist Theory and Music. Her current research explores the intersections of queer identity, gender, and race in hip hop.

Eric Lubarsky is currently revising his dissertation while working full time as a Senior Editor at Carnegie Hall in NYC. He also will act as a contributing editor to A-R Editions, Inc. Online Music Anthology, as the project expands to include a music history textbook. In 2016, he presented papers at conferences for the North American British Music Studies Association, the Society for American Music, and the Society for Eighteenth-Century Music, the last of which will be published in the conference proceedings.

Mary McArthur completed her B.M., magna cum laude, with majors in Piano Performance and in Philosophy at Furman University. Her research interests include exploring intersections between philosophy and music, particularly German instrumental music of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Mary is pursuing concurrently a Ph.D. in Musicology and an M.A. in Ethnomusicology. In 2016, Mary received the Ethnomusicology Fieldwork Grant to travel to Bali (where she spent six months in 2013) and continue her study of Balinese gamelan music as it relates to ritual practices. Mary received the Anne Clark Fehn Fellowship in 2016.

Trevor Nelson comes to Eastman with an M.A. in Musicology and Interdisciplinary Graduate Specialization in Women’s and Gender Studies from Michigan State University, and a B.M. in Instrumental Music Education from Appalachian State University. At MSU, he penned his thesis, The Dissident Dame: Alternative Feminist Methodologies and the Music of Ethel Smyth, which explored and proposed unconventional ways of understanding music associated with women’s suffrage movements. In addition to feminist political campaigns, he is interested in queer studies, as well as bodies in colonial spaces. Trevor is an active and passionate teacher, having won pedagogy awards at both Appalachian and MSU. His doctoral studies are supported by a Sproull Fellowship.

Dani Osterman completed a B.S. in Math and a B.A. in Music at The Ohio State University.  Her interests include Russian liturgical music from antiquity to the late 18th c. and looking at American musical theatre as a tastemaking agent with a specific interest towards the medium’s interaction with the historical eras and events depicted.

Jane Sylvester completed her B.M. in Saxophone Performance and a B.M. in Music Education with High Honors at Michigan State University. At Eastman, her current musicological interests include the connections and intersections between music, gender, and nature in German Lieder and opera from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Inspired by her sixteen years as a saxophonist, Jane is also fascinated by issues concerning the performative body. Most recently, she has presented papers at the Greater New York Chapter of the AMS, the Michigan Music Research Conference, and the Midwest Popular Culture Association. Jane was the recipient of the Anne Clark Fehn Fellowship in 2015.

 

A number of PhD graduates and alumni presented papers and otherwise formally participated at the AMS/SMT national meeting in Louisville (2015):

Papers by Current Students

  • Naomi Gregory, “The Curious Case of Compère’s ‘Sola caret monstris’: the Pope, the King, and the ‘fera pessima’”
  • Katherine Hutchings, “‘The Matter of France’: Ciconia, the Carolingians, and the Legacy of Antiquity”
  • Aaron James, “Absalom in Augsburg: The Reformation Context of the ‘Absalon’ Motets”

Papers by Alumni

  • Regina Compton (PhD ’15), “How to Enrage Alexander, or towards an Understanding of Handel’s Recitativo semplice and Theatrical Gesture”
  • Caroline Ehman (PhD ’13), “Reconceiving the Maternal Subject in Saariaho’s *Adriana Mater*”
  • Cindy L. Kim (PhD ’11), “In Defense of a Performers’ Art: Nineteenth-Century Singers’ Discourse on Ornamentation”
  • Marie Sumner Lott (PhD ’08), “’Who is the Knight?’ Rights and Responsibilities in Three Crusader Operas from the Early Romantic Era”
  • Martin Nedbal (PhD ’09), “Censoring the Harem: ‘Handkerchief ‘ Moments in Eighteenth-Century Viennese Operas and the Moralistic Conceptions of (German) National Theater”
  • Jennifer Ronyak (PhD ’10), “Intimate Confession, Public Exhortation: Andreas Romberg’s Setting of Friedrich Schiller’s ‘Die Sehnsucht’ and the Orchestral Lied at the Start of the Nineteenth Century”

Discussion participants, respondents, and chairs

  • Sarah Fuchs Sampson, session contributor for “Prima Donnas and Leading Men on the French Stage, 1830-1900
  • Elizabeth Wells (PhD ’04), session chair; Marjorie Roth (PhD ’05) and Mary Natvig (PhD ’91) session contributors for “Master-Teacher Rountable: Teaching without Technology”
  • Amy Wlodarski (PhD ’06), panel contributor for “The Hills Are Alive with the Sound of Music: Musical Theater at Girls’ Jewish Summer Camp”

Several recent graduates have accepted academic positions or have changed positions:

  • Aaron James, University of Rochester Music Department
  • Sarah Fuchs Sampson, Syracuse University
  • Kimberly Hannon Teal, University of Arkansas

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PhD Students, by Entrance Year

entered 2016

Thom Jencks has completed a B.A. in Philosophy and Music from Augustana College, as well as an M.Mus. at Royal Holloway University of London where he submitted with distinction a thesis with J. P. E. Harper-Scott titled “Where Are We?” examining topics of environment and identity in Charles Ives’s Piano Trio. He has also presented on topics such as musical modernism and John Luther Adams at conferences in Nottingham and Vancouver. His research interests center around the topics of aesthetics and ecologies of post-war music. tjencks@u.rochester.edu

Trevor Nelson comes to Eastman with an M.A. in Musicology and Interdisciplinary Graduate Specialization in Women’s and Gender Studies from Michigan State University, and a B.M. in Instrumental Music Education from Appalachian State University. At MSU, he penned his thesis, The Dissident Dame: Alternative Feminist Methodologies and the Music of Ethel Smyth, which explored and proposed unconventional ways of understanding music associated with women’s suffrage movements. In addition to feminist political campaigns, he is interested in queer studies, as well as bodies in colonial spaces. Trevor is an active and passionate teacher, having won pedagogy awards at both Appalachian and MSU. His doctoral studies are supported by a Sproull Fellowship. tnels17@u.rochester.edu

Dani Osterman completed a B.S. in Math and a B.A. in Music at The Ohio State University.  Her interests include Russian liturgical music from antiquity to the late 18th c. and looking at American musical theater as a taste-making agent with a specific interest towards the medium’s interaction with the historical eras and events depicted. dosterma@u.rochester.edu

entered 2015

Stephen Armstrong completed his master’s degrees in musicology and piano performance at Michigan State University, where he submitted a thesis on the historiography of Franz Liszt’s piano music. A chapter of his thesis is forthcoming (2015) in the Journal of the American Liszt Society. He has presented papers at AMS chapter meetings, the North American Conference on Nineteenth-Century Music, the North American Conference on Video Game Music, and at the “Music, Narrative, and the Moving Image” conference held by the International Association for Word and Music Studies. An avid pianist and rock keyboardist, he has performed throughout his native Michigan and in Italy. His research interests include virtuosity, mysticism, and music and literature studies. He holds a Sproull Fellowship. sarmstr6.u.rochester.edu

Mary McArthur completed her B.M., magna cum laude, with majors in Piano Performance and in Philosophy at Furman University. Her research interests include exploring intersections between philosophy and music, particularly German instrumental music of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Mary is pursuing concurrently a Ph.D. in Musicology and an M.A. in Ethnomusicology. mmcarth2@u.rochester.edu

Jane Sylvester completed her B.M. in Saxophone Performance and a B.M. in Music Education with High Honors at Michigan State University. Inspired by her sixteen years as a saxophonist, Jane is fascinated by issues concerning the performative body. jsylvest@u.rochester.edu

entered 2014

Gabrielle Cornish completed a B.A. with majors in Music and Russian Studies at the University of Rochester. Following her undergraduate degree, she spent a year living in Russia as a Fulbright Scholar. Her research interests include music and politics in the Soviet Union, Russian cinema and sound, and protest music in post-Soviet society. gcornish@u.rochester.edu

Austin Richey received an M.A. in Ethnomusicology from Eastman School of Music in 2014. His research interests include diasporic and transnational musics, with a particular focus on the emergent Zimbabwean diaspora. Austin is active as a performer and is a member of Eastman’s Gamelan Lila Muni and the Serevende Mbira Ensemble. arichey2@u.rochester.edu

Ryan Taussig joins the Eastman community with an M.M. in Musicology from University of Tennessee awarded in 2014 for a thesis entitled “Sonic Environmentalism: God, Nature, and Politics in Olivier Messiaen’s Des canyons aux étoiles . . ..” He received a B.M. from Crane School of Music, magna cum laude, in 2011 with majors in Musical Studies (Theory/History) and Music Education (Vocal). Ryan has presented his research at a number of conferences on the eastern seaboard including Ecomusicologies, AMS-GNY, SEM-SEC, and graduate symposia in Stony Brook, NY, Athens, GA, and Knoxville, TN. His interests lie primarily at the intersection of opera, politics, human geography, and environmental philosophy. He is a recipient of the Ann Clark Fehn Award. rtaussig@u.rochester.edu

entered 2013

Megan Steigerwald enters with an M.M in Vocal Performance from James Madison University, and a B.A in Performance (Voice) and honors in English Literature, magna cum laude, from Randolph-Macon Woman’s College. An active performer, Megan is interested in intersections of gender, vocality, and operatic performance. msteige2@u.rochester.edu

Alexis VanZalen recently completed a B.A. in History and a B.M. in Organ Performance at Lawrence University in Appleton, WI, where she received awards in both disciplines and graduated summa cum laude for her honors thesis on the seventeenth-century organist Dieterich Buxtehude’s civic and musical self-fashioning. She has presented at Vanderbilt University’s German Studies Conference, and intends to continue studying baroque instrumental music. avanzale@u.rochester.edu

entered 2012

Jacek Blaszkiewicz enters with an MA in Music History/Theory from Stony Brook University, and a BMus summa cum laude in piano from Montclair State University. His current interests include nineteenth-century francophone opera and visual metaphor in music. Jacek has presented papers at the Greater New York Chapter of the AMS and at the Stony Brook Graduate Music Symposium. He is a recipient of the Sproull Fellowship. JacekB1214@gmail.com

Jack Hanlon arrives at Eastman after earning a Bachelor’s Degree in Music Education from Illinois Wesleyan University, where he was recognized for his academic and performance achievements by the R. Dwight Drexler scholarship award. His current research interests include twentieth-century German and American opera. jhanlon4@u.rochester.edu

Lauron Kehrer completed her MA in Ethnomusicology at Eastman, as well as earning the Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies from the Susan B. Anthony Institute for Women and Gender Studies (University of Rochester). Lauron did her BM in Flute Performance at Michigan State University, with an undergraduate specialization in Women, Gender, and Social Justice. Her doctoral studies are supported by a Sproull Fellowship and the Ann Clark Fehn award. She has presented papers at national conferences including AMS, SAM, SEM, and Feminist Theory and Music. She is especially interested in popular music studies and queer theory. lkehrer@u.rochester.edu

Gail Lowther completed an MM in Music History and an MM in Music Education at Bowling Green State University. Her current research interests include twentieth-century French music and opera. glowther@u.rochester.edu

entered 2011

John Green completed a BM in Saxophone Performance from SUNY Fredonia and enters Eastman with the Fehn award to support his doctoral studies.  His current research focus includes John Cage and twentith-century American music. jgreen29@u.rochester.edu

Aaron James completed an MM in organ performance at Eastman following a BMus at the University of Western Ontario, where he received the Faculty of Music Gold Medal. He is pursuing a PhD in musicology concurrently with a DMA in organ. His primary research interests involve the aesthetics and reception history of twentieth-century modernist music. cjames12@u.rochester.edu

entered 2010

Eric Lubarsky enters with an MM in historical musicology from the University of Florida.  From the same school he also received a BM in clarinet and a BS in Journalism. He has received the prestigious Sproull Fellowship to support his doctoral studies.  His current research interests focus on the music of the Renaissance. In June 2011 he presented a paper on Margaret of Austria at the Med-Ren conference in Barcelona. elubarsk@u.rochester.edu

Michael Oldaker completed an MA in musicology at the University of Western Ontario, where he also received a BM in organ performance.  His MA work was supported by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Graduate Award.  He is especially interested in baroque music. moldaker@u.rochester.edu

Sarah Fuchs Sampson completed her MM with a double major in musicology and piano chamber music/accompanying at Ball State University. Her master’s thesis, “Rehabilitating Robert Schumann’s Late Chamber Works: Opp. 105 and 121 Reconsidered,” won the 2011 Ball State University Alumni Association Distinguished Thesis Award. Sarah received her BM, magna cum laude, in piano performance from Taylor University. In 2013, Sarah was nominated for the Eastman Graduate Teaching Assistant Prize. Her current research focuses on the role of sound technology in the production and reception of opera in belle-époque France. sfuchs2@u.rochester.edu

Maggee Van Speybroeck earned a BM in vocal performance from the University of Kansas.  She is particularly interested in researching lieder and other art song. mvanspey@u.rochester.edu

entered 2009

Regina Compton completed a BM in Clarinet Performance at Southern Methodist University and an MM in Music History at the College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati. Her research interests include 19th-century music and aesthetics. In spring 2011 she received one of Eastman’s teaching assistant awards and also the Jerald C. Graue Fellowship for an outstanding paper in musicology. rcompton@u.rochester.edu

entered 2008

Rohan Krishnamurthy completed the BA at Kalamazoo College with a double-degree in music and chemistry. He is a Provost Fellow and a percussionist who specializes in South Indian music. He is organizing a South Indian percussion ensemble at Eastman. He is a contributing author to Psychology of Music, ed. S.-L. Tan. rohan.krishnamurthy@rochester.edu

Anne Marie Weaver completed a BA in English at Goshen College and an MM in piano at Bowling Green State University. She is interested in 19th- and 20th-century music. She presented a paper on 19th-century Russian music at a conference at Cornell University in spring 2011. annemarie.weaver@rochester.edu

entered 2007

Tyler Cassidy-Heacock completed a BA in music history and theory while pursuing vocal performance at Oberlin College. She continues to perform new music at Eastman, and is pursuing a dissertation on signification in late 20th-century non-linguistic vocal chamber music for women’s voices.tyler.cassidyheacock@gmail.com

Alexander Stefaniak completed the BA at Baldwin-Wallace College in Ohio. He is a Sproull Fellow, and has an interest in 19th-century music. He received the Glenn Watkins Travelling Fellowship for research in Germany in fall 2011. astefan5@u.rochester.edu

entered 2006

Naomi Gregory completed the BA and MPhil at Cambridge University. She is a double-degree student, PhD in Musicology and DMA in organ, and she is a Sproull Fellow. In 2008 she received one of Eastman’s teaching assistant awards. ngregory@u.rochester.edu

Kimberly Hannon completed the BM in trumpet performance at the University of Oregon. She is pursuing research on jazz and canon formation. She has received the Glenn Watkins Travelling Fellowship in 2010, and the Elsa T. Johnson Dissertation Fellowship for 2011-12. khannon@u.rochester.edu

Amy Kintner completed the BA in English and German at the University of Portland in Oregon, while also studying music and performing on the clarinet. She spent a year on a Fulbright Fellowship in Vienna before coming to Eastman. Currently, Amy pursues research in the field of popular music studies, and her dissertation explores the depiction of utopia in music by female artists active from 1968 to the present. She has received an AAUW American Dissertation Fellowship for 2011-12. amy.schadenfroh@gmail.com

entered 2005

Caroline Ehman completed her BMus and MA from McGill University. She is a Sproull Fellow, and also the recipient of a Canadian fellowship from the SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council). Her dissertation topic is on treatments of the Faust legend in contemporary opera. cehman@u.rochester.edu

Katherine Hutchings earned the DMA in percussion at Eastman, and is now pursuing the PhD in Musicology. Her dissertation, “Mediating Ancients and Moderns, Humanists and Scholastics: Johannes Ciconia’s Nova musica and Its Cultural Contexts,” is in progress. In 2009 she won a Presser Foundation grant for dissertation research in Italy. For 2010-11 she won an American Association of University Women American Dissertation Fellowship. kh010j@u.rochester.edu

Tanya Sermer completed the BMus at McGill University. She has completed the MA in Ethnomusicology, and her dissertation topic is on “Soundscapes of the Old City of Jerusalem: Musical Practice, Communal Identity, and the Politics of Place.” Tanya received the International Dissertation Research Fellowship from the Social Science Research Council for ethnographic fieldwork in Jerusalem in 2010-11, and she is continuing her research in Jerusalem in 2011-12. tanya.sermer@rochester.edu

entered 2004

Maria Cristina Fava completed an MM in Music History and an MM in Ethnomusicology at Bowling Green State University, and she is a native of Italy. Her dissertation, “Marc Blitzstein and the Political Value of Music: New York City in the 1930s,” is in progress. In 2009, she received the Dina Epstein Award from the Music Library Association, and both the Elsa T. Johnson Fellowship and the Glenn Watkins Travelling Fellowship from the Eastman School of Music. Cristina has presented her research at various musicological conferences and meetings, including those of the Society for American Music and American Musicological Society. She has twice received the award for best student presentation at the AMS Midwest Chapter conference. mfava@u.rochester.edu

Lara Housez completed her BMus and MA in Music History at the University of Western Ontario. She is a recipient of a doctoral fellowship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the MLA’s Dena Epstein award for research in American music. Her dissertation, “Becoming Stephen Sondheim: From Forum to Company,” is in progress. She has presented papers on Sondheim, Kurt Weill, and postwar musicals at the annual meetings of the American Musicological Society, Society for American Music, Canadian University Music Society, and the New York–St. Lawrence and Midwest Chapters of the AMS, where she received the Indiana University Press Award for the Best Student Paper. Lara presented a talk on Sondheim’s Assassins at the national meeting of the SAM in 2011. laraevelyn@yahoo.com

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MA Students in Ethnomusicology

entered 2012

Rachel Brashier completed a Bachelor of Music at Eastern Illinois University in 1999, with a voice and education emphasis, and taught music for twelve years in the Chicagoland area before completing a Masters in Music History at Southern Illinois University in 2012. Her thesis concerned the hymns of women in Byzantine chant of the Greek Orthodox Church, on which subject she presented at the Feminist Theory and Music Conference in 2011. She is now interested in chant and religious music in diaspora communities of Orthodox Christians in the United States. rbrashie@u.rochester.edu

Austin Richey completed his BM in Music Performance at Western Washington University with a focus on percussion. Austin intends to pursue fieldwork-based study in Zimbabwe and focus on the synthesis of traditional music with modern styles. He is currently the Eastman Concert Office Intern for the Barbara B. Smith World Music Concert Series. arichey2@u.rochester.edu

entered 2011

Nawa Lanzilotti completed a BA in Music at the University of Rochester with a focus on cello performance and ethnomusicology. In Fall 2010 she entered into the 3+2 MA Ethnomusicology program, a five-year program that joins the final year of undergraduate study with first year of graduate coursework. Nawa pursues research that explores sound perception and musical experience in the Deaf community. At the 2011 SEM annual meeting she will present a paper on recent field work that examines the process of mounting the musical theater standard Guys & Dolls at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at RIT. llanzilo@u.rochester.edu

entered 2010

Kimberly Harrison came to Eastman from the State University of New York in Potsdam. kharri15@u.rochester.edu

Caroline Palser earned a BM in harp from Eastman before entering the MA program. caroline.palser@rochester.edu

Jennifer McKenzie came to Eastman from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. jmckenz3@u.rochester.edu

entered 2009

Emeric Viani earned a BM in piano from Eastman before entering the MA program. evani@gmail.com

entered 2008

Julie Beauregard completed BM and MA degrees in Music Education at Eastman, and is a double degree student for the PhD in Music Education and the MA in Ethnomusicology. The 2010 recipient of the Presser Music Award, Julie has conducted fieldwork in Ghana, West Africa, where she examined musical transmission processes. She has presented papers at ethnomusicology conferences on “Female Identity Construction in the Virtual Community of The L Word: Season 2” and “DJ and Dancers As Performers of Electronic Dance Music In A Night Club.” Julie was a nominee for the University of Rochester Presidential Diversity Award in 2010.  jbeaureg@u.rochester.edu

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